Criminal Suspects Deserve Genetic Privacy, Too

The conversation over police uploading suspects’ DNA to online databases is missing something important.

18 March 2019, Slate.com

Almost a year ago, police apprehended Joseph DeAngelo—dubbed the Golden State Killer—for more than a dozen murders and 50 rapes committed in the 1970s and ’80s. His arrest was thanks to the advent of open-source DNA databases…Read more >>> 

 

EPFL software mines rich medical data while keeping it secure

MedCo is the first operational system to protect sensitive patient data – including genetic information – so that it can be used collectively for crucial medical research

12 March 2019, EPFL News

Using the MedCo system, authorized researchers will be able to explore data from multiple sources like hospitals based on clinical and genetic criteria without compromising patient privacy. …Read more >>> 

 

 

How to Delete Your Data From 23andMe, Ancestry, and Other Sites

Worried about your privacy after taking an at-home DNA test? Here’s what you should know and what you can do.

29 January 2019, Consumer Reports

If you’ve sent a DNA sample such as a tube of spit to 23andMe, Ancestry, MyHeritage, or one of the many other companies that offer direct-to-consumer genetic testing, you’ve sent them the essential info…Read more >>> 

 

 

 

Everyday people can now map their genomes and maybe keep their privacy

For the first time, a company is offering a direct-to-consumer tool that can map out a person’s entire genome.

17 November 2018, qz.com

The service, which is run by Nebula Genomics, is a double-edged sword, though. On the one hand it can help a person search through a broad array of their genetic code to find disease-related genes. On the other, the company faces the herculean task…Read more >>>

How to Identify Almost Anyone in a Consumer Gene Database

New techniques that dig more deeply into genetic databases may soon make the anonymity of their customers’ DNA impossible to safeguard

11 October 2018, Scientific American

Researchers are becoming so adept at mining information from genealogical, medical and police genetic databases that it is becoming difficult to protect anyone’s privacy…Read more >>>